New Zealand Dog News

Reviewing the dog news in New Zealand with editors comments. Someone needs to keep reviewing how our dogs are doing in society.

June 26, 2008

$25 Million worth of drugs off the streets

In the four years since New Zealand Customs Service Drug Detector dogs have been trained to detect pseudoephedrine, they have found over 100kg.

This amount of precursor would have been used to make approximately $25 million worth of crystal methamphetamine.

When the effects of methamphetamine started becoming apparent in the community, and the precursor was regularly being intercepted at the border, Customs developed a training programme to introduce the dogs to ephedrine and pseudoephedrine scents.

Dave Huff, Chief Customs Officer Detector Dog Training said “There was a massive increase in importations of Contac NT. We needed to make sure all the dogs were active in meeting this threat.”

There's only an increase because there's MONEY in it? Who's fault is that? Cops and courts should have left cannabis alone, and all people would have smoked was mundane drug as opposed to pharmaceutical crap... or alcohol for that matter.

Along with pseudoephedrine the dogs are trained to detect other illicit drugs such as cocaine, crystal methamphetamine, ecstasy and heroin.

Did you know that dogs can NOT smell LSD... sh... don't tell the drug smugglers.

It is fitting that this landmark amount has been reached on June 26, the International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking.

Illicit drugs represent a major problem to society. No individual, family or community is safe where illicit drugs take control.

So why would people want to give the control to the gangs? I mean, if drugs are that bad, wouldn't you think that the government would want to regulate it, and not give the power to the gangs. Makes absolutely no scents (sic).

Customs has used detector dogs since 1975. During this period the dogs have had thousands of interceptions, ranging from relatively small amounts of drugs, to multi kilo amounts, the largest in excess of 180kg.

There are nine drug detector dogs working for Customs, with another three in training. The dogs work alongside customs officers finding drugs at international airports in suitcases and on the bodies of passengers. They also search international mail, cargo, ships and small craft.

Mr Huff said “It’s a great feeling every time a dog finds drugs. We remember that all the time and effort we put into training the dogs actually does make a difference to our communities.”

Don't you mean.. thank god there are drugs around because if there weren't we'd be out of a job!! Make a difference to our community! huh? ... there is NO difference. Drugs are STILL on the streets and it's now more prevelant. So, which part of the drug laws WORK?

Customs contributes data to the Drug Harm Index and will draw from the index to measure the effectiveness of operations and interceptions on the drug trade in New Zealand.

“The Drug Harm Index will show us not only the street value of the drugs we intercept, but also the benefits to the community in getting these drugs off the street.” Mr Huff said.

The Drug Index... what a joke ! I mean, who did this study? The police, the customs.. sounds pretty bias to me.

3 Comments:

  • At 9:42 a.m., Blogger kayakotto said…

    Methamphetamine use, abuse, and addiction has reach epidemic proportions worldwide. www.methamphetamineaddiction.com has lots of great data on the epidemic. As a professional who deals with this on a daily basis I can tell you that there is NO socially redeeming quality to this drug whatsoever!

     
  • At 11:47 a.m., Anonymous Blair Anderson said…

    >As a professional who deals with this on a daily basis

    Hang on a moment, I thought prohibition was supposed to work! There should be none. How come you see it on a daily basis? Could it be that Professor James Roumasette (Economics, Haiwaii Uni) got it right when he described the clamping down on cannabis and subsequent escalation of methamphetamine as 'black hole economics'.?

    >I can tell you that there is NO socially redeeming quality to this drug whatsoever!


    There is no redeeming quality to eating coal either, but it doesnt take incarceration 'as a health intervention' to reduce the prevelence therein. And before 'but coal is not addicting' - the same comment applies to tobacco and alcohol.

    Methamphetamine is an ugly drug (opinion), for which there is a very high demand (fact).

    The prevlence of meth is a product of poor drug policy, without which you wouldnt have a job.

    I can only offer conjecture as to see why you support a policy of failure.

    Please indicate in which area of 'control' and 'intervention' success can be demonstrated.

    (tip: Discuss availability and price since the policy was implemented.)

    When we bust a 'dealer' is this a measure of success as the heading infers? Or have we only created another job opportunity?

    Are there any areas of drug policy 'globally' that can be demonstrated to have been effective?

    Before meth escalated, Japanese business culture literally ran on 'little pills' - the problems created by this widespread social phenomenon were few indeed. Was this genetic?

    As a professional I am sure you will have given thought to some of these pressing questions, accordingly I welcome your informed reply.

    Cheers,
    Blair Anderson
    Educators for Sensible Drug Policy.

     
  • At 3:22 p.m., Anonymous Anonymous said…

    IT'S TIME TO REMOVE ALL THE POLITICIANS THAT PROMOTE PROHIBITION.
    HOW MANY MORE LIVES HAVE TO BE NEEDLESSLY DEVASTATED OR LOST?
    PROHIBITED DRUGS ARE WAY EASIER FOR KIDS TO GET THAN REGULATED DRUGS!
    PROHIBITION NEVER WORKS IT JUST CAUSES CRIME & VIOLENCE.

    The USA spends $69 billion a year on the drug war, builds 900 new prison beds and hires 150 more correction officers every two weeks, arrests someone on a drug charge every 17 seconds, jails more people than any nation and has killed over 100,000 citizens in the drug war.

    In 1914 when there were NO PROHIBITED DRUGS 1.3% of our population was addicted to drugs, TODAY 1.3% of our population is STILL ADDICTED TO DRUGS BUT THERE’S WAY MORE CRIME AND VIOLENCE BECAUSE OF THE HUGE PROFITS PROHIBITION GENERATES. DRUGS TODAY ARE MORE POTENT, MORE READILY AVAILABLE AND LESS EXPENSIVE THAN THEY WERE IN THE EARLY 70’S WHEN RICHARD NIXON STARTED THE WAR ON DRUGS.

    Everyone needs to know about “Jury Nullification”. You can learn more here: http://fija.org If you are called for jury duty and you don’t agree with the law the person is charged with, you have the right to vote NOT GUILTY, NO MATTER WHAT EVIDENCE IS PRODUCED. Jurors implementing this right in ALL NON-VIOLENT drug cases will shut down the ridiculous laws of prohibition. One juror in each case is all it takes. The bottom line is a juror has the RIGHT to JUDGE not only the accused person but the LAW the person is accused of breaking. Don’t be intimidated stick to your position.

    There’s only been one drug success story in history, tobacco, BY FAR THE MOST DEADLY and one of the MOST ADDICTIVE drugs. Almost half the users quit because of REGULATION, ACCURATE INFORMATION AND MEDICAL TREATMENT. No one went to jail and no one got killed.

    DEMAND your Constitutional rights. The right; to freedom of religion, free speech, a free press, to keep and bear arms, to be secure in your person, house, papers and effects against unreasonable search and seizure, to life, liberty and property, to be protected from having your property taken by the government without due process of law and without just compensation, to confront the witnesses against you, to be protected from excessive bail, excessive fines, cruel and unusual punishment, to vote and many others have been denied to millions of Americans in the name of the drug war.

    TAKE ACTION. JOIN THE EMAIL LIST, WATCH THE VIDEOS:
    Internet Explorer: http://jsknow.angelfire.com/home
    Other Browsers: http://jsknow.angelfire.com/index.html

     

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